Posted by on Jul 5, 2017 in Blog | 0 comments

The Wales Coast Path is 870 miles in length, running from Chepstow in South Wales to Queensferry in the North. It is split into 8 geographical sections that run along the entire coastline, passing through areas of national importance and outstanding natural beauty. If you are not up for doing the whole 870 miles, there are some beautiful sections on the Llyn Peninsula and down towards Barmouth and Fairborne, taking you through small fishing villages, along estuaries and miles of sandy beaches…


The hidden coves of the Llyn Peninsula

NEFYN TO PORTH DINLLAEN

4.5km / 2.75 miles
From the rocky promontory of Porth Dinllaen you can admire views to the east and west along the Llŷn Peninsula’s northern coast. You have a good chance of seeing seals close to shore.


Aberdaron, a traditional welsh village

PORTH OER (WHISTLING SANDS) TO ABERDARON

15km / 9.25miles
As you walk toward Aberdaron you will see Bardsey Island, once a destination for pilgrims. According to legend three visits to Bardsey was equivalent to one visit to Rome. The sands at Porth Oer often ‘whistle’ when you walk on them, one of only two beaches in Europe that does this.


#Criccieth, my third favourite castle.

CRICCIETH TO PORTHMADOG

10.5km / 6.5miles
Begin your walk in Criccieth where you can explore the wonderful Criccieth Castle before heading south along this glorious coastline to Porthmadog. Along the way, you’ll find the famous and picturesque Black Rock Sands.


Wales Coastal Path at Harlech Beach

HARLECH TO TALYBONT

17km / 12miles
These two stunning beaches offer miles of walking opportunities, with plenty of chances for refreshments along the way! You can shorten this walk in several places by catching the Cambrian Coast Railway, which has stations at frequent intervals.


Barmouth bridge nearby

BARMOUTH TO FAIRBOURNE

6km / 3.75miles
With spectacular views up the Mawddach Estuary and Cadair Idris looming in the distance, this is an unchallenging walk over the estuary. It is possible to catch the train back for an even more leisurely outing.